Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
       
     
Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Christ the Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Graffiti, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Saint Sebastian Cathedral, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Contemporary Art Museum, Niteroi
       
     
Rio Scenarium nightclub, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
       
     
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Rio de Janeiro (River of January in Portuguese)  is the second most populous municipality in Brasil. It is also one of the most visited cities in the Southern Hemisphere and is known for its natural settings, Carnival, samba, bossa nova and balneario beaches such as Barra da Tijuca, Copacabana, Ipanema and Leblon. In addition to the beaches, some of the most famous landmarks include the giant statue of Christ the Redeemer; Sugarloaf Mountain with its cable car;  theSambadrome, a permanent grandstand-lined parade avenue which is used during Carnival; and Maracana Stadium, one of the world's largest football stadiums.

Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro

Copacabana beach, located at the Atlantic shore, stretches from Posto Dois (lifeguard watchtower Two) to Posto Seis (lifeguard watchtower Six). Leme is at Posto Um (lifeguard watchtower One). There are historic forts at both ends of Copacabana beach: Fort Copacabana, built in 1914 at the south end by Posto Seis and Fort Duque de Caxias, built in 1779 at the north end. Hotels, restaurants, bars, night clubs, and residential buildings dot the promenade facing Avenida Atlantica.
Copacabana beach plays host to millions of revellers during the annual New Year's Eve celebrations and in most years has been the official venue of the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup.  The 2016 Summer Olympics Beach Volleyball matches were played here in August.

Christ the Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Christ the Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro

The famous statue of Christ the Redeemer (or Cristo Redentor) was unveiled in 1931 and was named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in 2007. Built with concrete and sandstone, the hovering and protective Christ stands 130 feet (39 meters) tall, his arms spanning 98 feet (30 meters). Over the years it has undergone periodic repairs and renovations, including a thorough cleaning in 1980, in preparation for the visit of Pope John Paul II to Brazil that year, and a major project in 2010, when the surface was repaired and refurbished.

Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro

The tranquility of Santa Teresa neighborhood can be deceiving. Walking around Largo de Guimarães is fine but the winding maze of streets makes it really easy to get lost. Santa Teresa is surrounded by many favelas: Amigos de Santa Teresa, Francisco de Castro, Luiz Marcelino, Miguel Austragelésio, Parque Catete, Prazeres, Travessa Vista Alegre, Unidos de Santa Teresa, Vila Paraíso and Amigos do Vale so you better make sure you know where you are going and that it’s safe. If it’s late at night we adviseto take a cab back home. Walking from Santa Teresa to Lapa at night is not recommended. You can get robbed doing just that.

Graffiti, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Graffiti, Rio de Janeiro

Graffiti in Rio de Janeiro is some of the most festive, whimsical and lighthearted graffiti you've seen anywhere. Though the street art feels like it’s being taken seriously, the pervasive style is bold, playful, colorful, and full of bizarre scenes, stylized characters and undecipherable situations.
The City of Rio has lax graffiti laws that most likely serve their own self-interest, and the city legally allows street artists to paint on rundown and decrepit walls.

Saint Sebastian Cathedral, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Saint Sebastian Cathedral, Rio de Janeiro

The new Saint Sebastian of Rio de Janeiro Cathedral was build between 1964 and 1997. The architecture of the cathedral was inspired by a Mayan pyramid. The cone-shaped cathedral is 106 meters in diameter at the base and 75 meters high. It was designed by Edgar de Oliveira da Fonseca.
Inside, the stained glass in vivid colors extends over the walls in four directions. The drawings of each strip of glass have different colors allowing the sunlight projection to change depending on the time of the day.

Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro

Two cable cars take you to the top of Sugarloaf. They run from 8:00AM to 10:00PM. The lower cable car starts from Praca General Tiburcio at Praia Vermelha and takes you 220 m high to Morro da Urca where you already have a beautiful view. The upper cable car takes you from Morro da Urca to Sugarloaf. Standing on the Sugarloaf platform at 396 m above sea level you have a marvelous views of Rio de Janeiro downtown, the Southern beaches, Corcovado and Niteroi Bridge. Up there one understands why many people consider Rio de Janeiro to be the most beautiful town in the world. Evenings are the best time to visit Sugarloaf and enjoy the magnificent sunset.

Contemporary Art Museum, Niteroi
       
     
Contemporary Art Museum, Niteroi

The Niterói Contemporary Art Museum (Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Niterói — MAC) situated in the city of Niterói is one of the city’s main landmarks. It was completed in 1996.
Designed by Oscar Niemeyer with the assistance of structural engineer Bruno Contarini, who had worked with Niemeyer on earlier projects, the MAC- Niterói is 16 meters high. Its cupola has a diameter of 50 meters and shelters three floors. The museum projects itself over Boa Viagem (“Good Journey”) beach. More than 817 square metres (8,790 sq ft) reflecting pool surrounds the cylindrical base of the flower-like building.

Rio Scenarium nightclub, Rio de Janeiro
       
     
Rio Scenarium nightclub, Rio de Janeiro

Rio Scenarium, the spacious three-level club, has been ranked by reviewers as the city’s best nightlife scene . The two top floors overlook the dance floor and stage at ground level, allowing you to chat with friends and still listen to the music. Buy a caipirinha, a traditional Brazilian cocktail made with cachaça (sugarcane hard liquor) and small plates called porções.  Spend the rest of the night strutting your moves to bossa nova, samba or choro.