OCBC Skyway in Gardens by the Bay, Singapore
       
     
Conservatory Flower Dome, Singapore
       
     
Conservatory Cloud Forest Dome, Singapore
       
     
ArtScience Museum, Singapore
       
     
Raffles Hotel, Singapore
       
     
Masjid Sultan Mosque, Singapore
       
     
Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple, Singapore
       
     
CYCLON Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore
       
     
HUMAN Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore
       
     
Sentosa Beaches, Singapore
       
     
OCBC Skyway in Gardens by the Bay, Singapore
       
     
OCBC Skyway in Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

There’s nothing quite like a stroll along the OCBC Skyway. Surrounded by panoramic vistas of the Gardens and Marina Bay skyline, this 128m long aerial walkway is an experience not to be missed. Sitting 22m above ground, the OCBC Skyway at the Supertree Grove lets you get an up-close look at the technical marvels of the Gardens’ futuristic Supertrees.
During the day, a stroll along this aerial walkway presents glorious photo-taking opportunities to capture the scenic beauty of the surrounding flora. It is open daily from 9am to 9pm but in the event of inclement weather, special events or other reasons aerial walkway might be closed.

Conservatory Flower Dome, Singapore
       
     
Conservatory Flower Dome, Singapore

Designed with glass that sits on a steel grid which acts like an eggshell, the two Cooled Conservatories: Flower and Cloud Forest Domes at Gardens by the Bay are the world’s largest columnless greenhouses.
Flower Dome's indoor temperature ranges from 73-75ºF and humidity is 60% – 80%. These conditions support flowers and plants from the Mediterranean and semi-arid regions like South Africa, California, parts of Spain and Italy.
3,332 glass panels of 42 different shapes and sizes were needed to cover the whole 16,000sq m surface area of the Flower Dome.

Conservatory Cloud Forest Dome, Singapore
       
     
Conservatory Cloud Forest Dome, Singapore

The Cloud Forest Dome showcases plant life from tropical highlands up to 2,000 meters above sea level. It features a 35m tall mountain covered in lush vegetation, shrouding the world’s tallest indoor waterfall.
Take the lift to the top of the mountain to discover the unique biodiversity and geology of cloud forests. Then take a stroll along a walkway in the clouds for an aerial view of the canopy and mountainside below. Indoor temperature ranges from 73-75ºF and humidity is 80% – 90%. 2,577 glass panels of 690 different shapes and sizes were needed to cover the whole 12,000sq m surface area of the dome.

ArtScience Museum, Singapore
       
     
ArtScience Museum, Singapore

Designed by renowned architect Moshie Safdie, the lotus-inspired ArtScience Museum has been called The Welcoming Hand of Singapore. The building form is made up of 10 "fingers" anchored by a unique round base in the middle. The design of each finger reveals different gallery spaces featuring skylights at the "fingertips" that illuminate the dramatically curved interior walls. The museum's roof channels rainwater through the central atrium of the building creating a 35-meter water drop into a small, reflecting pool. The rainwater is then recycled for use in the building. Material such as Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) was used for the construction of this architectural wonder.

Raffles Hotel, Singapore
       
     
Raffles Hotel, Singapore

The year was 1887 when the doors to the Raffles Hotel Singapore first opened. Since then, this luxury five star hotel in Singapore has become an icon that epitomizes the romance of the Far East: an intoxicating blend of luxury, history and colonial design.
Situated in the heart of the business and civic district, Raffles Singapore is a veritable oasis in the city. Its classic colonial architecture has been perfectly preserved and provides a stark but lively contrast against its modern-skyscraper neighbors.
Through the decades, liveried Sikh doormen have welcomed some of the most famous personalities, from writers to celebrities, politicians and members of royalty.

Masjid Sultan Mosque, Singapore
       
     
Masjid Sultan Mosque, Singapore

Masjid Sultan is a prominent mosque in Singapore and one of the country’s most impressive religious buildings. The mosque was built in 1824 for Sultan Hussein Shah, the first sultan of Singapore. Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore, gave $3,000 to the construction.
A hundred years later, the old mosque was in desperate need of repair. The present mosque was designed by Denis Santry from Swan and Maclaren, Singapore’s oldest architectural firm, and rebuilt in 1932. While you’re there, look closer at the onion domes. Each dome base is decorated with glass bottle ends, donated by poor Muslims so that all Muslims, not just the rich, could contribute.

Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple, Singapore
       
     
Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple, Singapore

Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple, Singapore

The Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple is dedicated to the Hindu goddess Kali, fierce embodiment of Shakti and the god Shiva's wife, Parvati.
Kali has always been popular in Bengal, the birthplace of the laborers who built this temple in 1881. Images of Kali within the Temple show her wearing a garland of skulls and Kali sharing more peaceful family moments with her sons Ganesha and Murugan.
The building is constructed in the style of South Indian Tamil temples common in Tamil Nadu as opposed to the style of Northeastern Indian Kali temples in Bengal, where her worship is extremely widespread but the style of temple construction differs considerably.

CYCLON Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore
       
     
CYCLON Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore

Battlestar Galactica: Human vs. Cylon is a pair of steel, dueling roller coasters at Universal Studios Singapore. One of the coasters is an inverted roller coaster track in sliver, and the other half is a traditional seated roller coaster in red. The coasters, which opened in 2010 reach 42.5 metres (139 ft) in height and are the tallest dueling coasters in the world. The Cylon coaster is a coaster designed like the Cylon Raider suspended from the track with legs free that performs intense maneuvers including several inversions in the form of a zero-g roll, a Cobra roll, corkscrews and vertical loops. The Cylon coaster also plunges into a 5-metre (16 ft) deep pit filled with artificial fog to give thrill seekers the sensation of a near miss with the ground. It also includes sudden turns close to buildings emphasizing the sensation of a near miss.

HUMAN Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore
       
     
HUMAN Roller Coaster, Sentosa Island, Singapore

The Human coaster is designed like the Colonial Viper for riders who want a roller coaster experience without inversions. According to Universal Studios Singapore engineers, riders on the Human track experience more G-forces than those on the Cylon track. At certain points in the ride, the coaster reaches speed of up to 90 kilometres per hour (56 mph).

Sentosa Beaches, Singapore
       
     
Sentosa Beaches, Singapore

Home to the coolest bars and restaurants, Sentosa beaches: Siloso, Palawan and Tanjongare to head to for fun - day and night.
Get into your favorite bikini and take a dip. Themed bars abound - you can surf a man-made wave or chill-out in a whirlpool bath on the beach. A host of shopping options awaits, as well as tempting all-day menus from exceptional bistros and restaurants.
Try your hand at kayaking, as well as cycling, rollerblading and other exciting beach activities.
After dark, Sentosabeaches really come alive, with parties, music, lively bars and restaurants celebrating the beach lifestyle long into the night – every night.